Teens and seniors tend to drive old, unsafe cars

One study has shown how newly licensed drivers and drivers 65 and older tend to travel around in older vehicles. This can pose a danger whether driving in Texas or elsewhere because older vehicles are not equipped with features like electronic stability control and side and curtain airbags. Stability control can prevent crashes while airbags can mitigate their severity.

A large-scale study on New Jersey drivers

Researchers in Philadelphia studied the drivers of neighboring New Jersey. The team analyzed all the crashes in that state spanning the years 2010 to 2017, and after determining every vehicle’s VIN, they found out the vehicle’s age, engine power and other characteristics, including whether or not it had electronic stability control and side airbags.

The researchers found that younger and older drivers tend to drive old, unsafe vehicles. Incidentally, teens and drivers 65 and older are the two age groups at the highest risk for a car crash. Elderly drivers also see the highest fatality rate.

Lower income means older vehicles

Income levels naturally influenced the results. Across all age groups, lower-income drivers tended to drive older vehicles. Researchers emphasize that there are still safe vehicle options, some for less than $7,000, for those with lower incomes so that they can prioritize their safety.

Claim against a negligent driver

When filing a personal injury claim, the important thing is proving the other side’s negligence. This means showing the definite failure of the at-fault driver to exercise the duty of care to other road users, and it can include actions like DUI, speeding and drowsy driving. To see how much you are eligible for in compensatory damages, you may consider having a lawyer assess the case. If hired, he or she may speak on your behalf at the negotiation table.